The Evolution of Infrared5

June 21st, 2011 by Keith Peters

I joined Infrared5 back in November 2007. Those were very different times. We were a hard core Flash shop, focusing on Red5 Server based applications and Papervision3D. The iPhone had been out for less than six months and only Apple could write apps for it. The iPod Touch was just a few weeks old. Nobody had heard of Android. Tablets were just a failed venture by Microsoft that most people had forgotten about a few years before. Nobody was particularly excited about HTML (5 or otherwise) or JavaScript. If there was any perceived threat to Flash at the time, it might have been Silverlight, but nobody was particularly worried about that.

Now, the landscape is very different. I’m not going to say Flash is dead. I don’t think it is. I don’t even think that it is dying, per se. What is happening though, is that there are so many other cool and interesting things out there now, that Flash has lost its place in the spotlight for many developers. Also, I think that Flash initially had a very low learning curve and very little barrier to entry. A lot of Flash developers grew up as Flash did, learned real programming, object orientation, design patterns, best practices, etc., and were then able to branch out to other languages and platforms.

I have to say, that Infrared5 has not only rolled with the changes very well, but has completely embraced the change. I think virtually all of our front end developers are now seasoned iOS developers. Several have embraced Android development as well. We have Windows Phone 7 knowledge (mostly me), and our 3D platform has moved from Papervision to Unity. We’re doing HTML5 stuff as well as Flash and Flex sites, iPad apps, kiosk applications. Many of our projects even span multiple platforms – a Flex 4 app with an HTML5 public facing site, Flash or Unity 3D games with a companion iPhone app via Brass Monkey.

The company’s tag line is “Yeah, we can build that.” I’d say we’ve lived up to that.

In closing, I ran across this quote the other day that I really loved. It comes from a free on line book, “Learn Python the Hard Way”, by Zed A. Shaw, which you can find here: http://learnpythonthehardway.org/ . In the last section called “Advice From An Old Programmer”, he says:

“What I discovered after this journey of learning is that the languages did not matter, it’s what you do with them. Actually, I always knew that, but I’d get distracted by the languages and forget it periodically. Now I never forget it, and neither should you.

Which programming language you learn and use does not matter. Do not get sucked into the religion surrounding programming languages as that will only blind you to their true purpose of being your tool for doing interesting things.

Programming as an intellectual activity is the only art form that allows you to create interactive art. You can create projects that other people can play with, and you can talk to them indirectly. No other art form is quite this interactive. Movies flow to the audience in one direction. Paintings do not move. Code goes both ways.”

The full quote is here: http://learnpythonthehardway.org/book/advice.html

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One Response to “The Evolution of Infrared5”

  1. Lustige Bilder Says:

    Ich bin durch Google hier gelandet, war sicher nicht mein letzter Besuch, weiter so! :)

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