Seven weeks. Seven teams. ONE ULTIMATE APP!

February 6th, 2013 by Rosie

Infrared5 and Brass Monkey are excited to announce their participation in Intel Software’s Ultimate Coder Challenge, ‘Going Perceptual’! The IR5/Brass Monkey team, along with six other teams from across the globe, will be competing in this seven week challenge to build the ultimate app. The teams will be using the latest Ultrabook convertible hardware, along with the Intel Perceptual Computing SDK and camera to build the prototype. The competitors range from large teams to individual developers, and each will take a unique approach to the challenge. The question will be which team or individual can execute their vision with the most success under such strict time constraints?

Here at Infrared5/Brass Monkey headquarters, we have our heads in the clouds and our noses to the grindstone. We are dreaming big, hoping to create a game that will take user experience to the next level. We are combining game play experiences like those available on Nintendo’s Wii U and Microsoft Kinect. The team will use the Intel Perceptual Computing SDK for head tracking, which will allow the player to essentially peer into the tablet/laptop screen like a window. The 3D world will change as the player moves his head. We’ve seen other experiments that do this with other technology and think it is really remarkable. This one using Wii-motes by Johnny Lee is one of the most famous. Our team will be exploring this effect and other uses of the Intel Perceptual Computing SDK combined with the Brass Monkey’s SDK (using a smartphone as a controller) to create a cutting edge, immersive experience. Not only that, but our creative team is coming up with all original IP to showcase the work.

Intel will feature documentation of the ups and downs of this process for each team, beginning February 15th. We will be posting weekly on our progress, sharing details about the code we are writing, and pointing out the challenges we face along the way. Be sure to check back here as the contest gets under way.

What would you build if you were in the competition? Let us know if you have creative ideas on how to use this technology; we would love to hear them.

We would like to thank Intel for this wonderful opportunity and wish our competitors the best of luck! Game on!

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Top 10 Prominent Boston Area Game Developer Groups and Organizations That You Should Pay Attention To

December 14th, 2012 by Elliott Mitchell

Top 10 Prominent Boston Area Game Developer Groups and Organizations That You Should Pay Attention To:

Scott Macmillan (co-founder Boston Indies), Darius Kazemi (co-organizer Boston Post Mortem) and Alex Schwartz (co-founder Boston Unity Group) preparing for a Boston Post Mortem presentation July 2011. (Photo- Elliott Mitchell co-founder Boston Unity Group)

The Boston area game developer scene has a generous and open community that nurtures indies, startups, students and AAA game studios alike. The evidence of this is more than abundant. On almost any given day one can find a game industry event ranging from casual meet-ups, demo nights and intense panel discussions. As I am an indie game developer and technical director, I will focus more closely on groups that are indie game developer related. One thing can be assured, all of these groups are prominent, worthwhile and you should check them out if you haven’t already done so!

1 ) International Game Developers Association (IDGA) – Boston Post Mortem (BPM)

The Boston based chapter of the IDGA was founded in 1997 by Kent Quirk, Steve Meretzk & Rick Goodman at John Harvard’s Brewhouse. Boston Post Mortem is internationally renowned as an example of how to grow and nurture a game developer community. BPM is the seminal game developer organization in the Boston area. Currently held at The Skellig in Waltham, MA, BPM is a monthly IDGA chapter meeting focused around industry related topics. BPM hosts expert speakers, industry panels, great networking opportunities and grog.

Frequency: Monthly
Membership Required: No, but IDGA membership is encouraged
Admission to Meetings: Usually free
Web: http://www.bostonpostmortem.org/
Twitter: @BosPostMortem

2 ) Boston Indies (BI)

Boston Indies is, as the name would indicate, a Boston based group for indie game developers. BI was founded in 2009 by Scott Macmillan and Jim Buck as an indie game developer alternative to the large Boston Post Mortem group.  Boston Indies featured indie developer presentations, BYOB and chipping in for pizza. Meet-ups were hosted at the Betahouse co-working space at MIT in Cambridge, MA. BI quickly grew larger and moved locations to The Asgard and settling most recently at the Bocoup Loft in South Boston. At BI meetups, indie developers present on relevant topics, hold game demo nights and network. Boston Indies is notable because it spawned the very successful Boston Festival of Indie Games in the fall of 2012.

Frequency: Monthly
Membership Required: No
Admission to Meetings: Free
Web: www.bostonindies.com
Twitter: @BostonIndies

3 ) The Boston Unity Group (BUG)

Founded in 2012 by Alex Schwartz and Elliott Mitchell, The Boston Unity User Group (BUG) is a bi-monthly gathering of Unity developers in the Boston area. Born from the inspiration and traditions of Boston Post Mortem and Boston Indies, BUG events are Unity game development related meetups where members ranging from professionals to hobbyist unite to learn from presentations, demo their projects, network and continue to build bridges in the Boston area game development community and beyond. BUG is renowned by local and international developers, as well as by Unity Technologies, as one of the first and largest Unity user groups in the world. Meetings have been frequently held at the Microsoft New England Research Center, Meadhall and the Asgard in Cambridge, MA.

Frequency:  Bi-Monthly
Membership Required:  Meetup.com registration required
Admission to Meetings:  Free
Web:  http://www.meetup.com/B-U-G-Boston-Unity-Group/
Twitter:  @BosUnityGroup

4 ) Women In Games (WIG)

Founded by Courtney Stanton in 2010, Women in Games Boston is the official Boston chapter of the International Game Developers Association’s Women in Games Special Interest Group. Renown industry speakers present on relevant game development topics but what differentiates WIG is the it’s predominately female perspective and unique industry support. WIG meets monthly at The Asgard in Cambridge. Developers from AAA, indie studios and students regularly attend. WIG is an event open to women and their allies to attend.

Frequency: Monthly
Membership Required: No
Admission to Meetings: Free
Web: http://wigboston.wordpress.com/
Twitter: @WIGboston

5 ) Boston HTML5 Game Development Group

The Boston HTML5 Game Developer Group was founded in 2010 by Pascal Rettig. On the group’s meetup webpage, the description reads  “A gathering of the minds on tips, tricks and best practices for using HTML5 as a platform for developing highly-interactive in-browser applications (with a focus on Game Development)”. The HTML5 game development Group in Boston boasts an impressive roster of members and speakers. Attended and led by prominent industry leaders and innovators, the Boston HTML5 Game Developer Group is a monthly meetup held at Bocoup Loft in Boston, MA.

Membership Required: Meetup membership encouraged
Admission to Meetings: Free
Web: http://www.meetup.com/Boston-HTML5-Game-Development/
Twitter: #Boston #HTML5

6 ) MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge  - New England Games Community Circle (NEGamesSIG)

Originally founded in 2007 by Michael Cavaretta as The New England Game SIG, newly renamed New England Games Community Cirle  is a group rooted in greater MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge. NEGCC focuses on being a hub for dynamic games and interactive entertainment industries throughout New England.  NEGCC events are predictably very good and well attended with their professional panel discussions featuring a mix of innovative leaders from across the business of games. Events regularly are held in various locations around Cambridge, MA including the MIT Stata Center and the Microsoft New England Research Center.

Frequency: Regularly dispersed throughout the year
Membership Required: Not Always / Membership encouraged with worthwhile benefits.
Admission to Meetings: Depends on event and if you’re a member
Web: http://gamescircle.org/
Twitter: #NEGCC #NEGamesSIG

7 ) The Massachusetts Digital Games Institute (MassDiGI)

The Massachusetts Digital Games Institute was founded in 2010 by Timothy Loew and Robert E. Johnson, Ph. D.  This is a unique group focused on building pathways between academia and industry, while nurturing entrepreneurship and economic development within the game industry across Massachusetts. MassDiGI holds game industry related events not only in the Boston area but across the entire Commonwealth. MassDiGI also runs some larger events and programs like the MassDiGI Game Challenge, where prominent industry experts mentor competing game development teams. Mass DiGI also holds a Summer of Innovation Program where students are mentored by industry experts while they form teams and develop marketable games over the summer. Mass DiGI is headquartered at Becker College in Worcester, MA.

Frequency: Slightly Random
Membership Required: No Membership
Admission to Meetings: Mostly free / Some events and programs cost money
Web: http://www.massdigi.org/
Twitter: @mass_digi

8 ) Mass Technology Leadership Council – Digital Games Cluster (MassTLC)

MassTLC is a large organization that encompasses much more than games. The MassTLC Digital Games Cluster is led by the likes of Tom Hopcroft and Christine Nolan, among others, who work diligently to raise awareness about the region’s game industry and build support for a breadth of Massachusetts game developers.  MassTLC holds regular events benefit startups, midsized companies and large corporations across Massachusetts. With a focus on economic development, MassTLC helps those those looking to network, find mentors, funding and other resources vital to a game studio of any scale. One of my favorite MassTLC events is the MassTLC PAX East – Made in MA Party. The Party serves to highlight hundreds of Massachusetts game developers to the media as well as out of state industry folks on the evening before the the massive PAX East game developer conference begins. MassTLC Events are frequently held at the Microsoft New England Research Center.

Frequency: Regularly / Slightly Random
Membership Required: Not Always / Membership encouraged with worthwhile benefits.
Admission to Meetings: Depends on event and if you’re a member
Web: http://www.masstlc.org/?page=DigitalGames
Twitter: @MassTLC

9 ) Boston Game Jams

Founded in 2011 by Darren Torpey, Boston Game Jams is a unique group. Modeled after the Nordic Game Jam, IGDA Global Game Jam and others less  known game jams, Boston Game Jams is an ongoing series of ad-hoc game jams held in the Boston area. As Darren States on the Boston Game Jam’s website, “It is not a formal organization of any kind, but rather it’s more of a grassroots community that is growing out of a shared desire to learn and create games together in an open, fun, and highly collaborative environment.” Boston Game Jams is a great venue for people of all skill levels to come together and collaboratively create games around given themes within a very short period of time. Participants range from professionals to novices. Boston Game Jams have historically been held at the innovative Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab which has recently morphed into the new MIT Game Lab.

Frequency: Random
Membership Required: No
Admission to Meetings: Free / Food Donations Welcome
Web: http://bostongamejams.com/
Twitter: @bostongamejams

10 ) Boston Autodesk Animation User Group Association (BostonAAUGA)

BostonAAUGA is an official Autodesk User Group. Founded in 2008, BostonAAUGA joined forces in June 2012 with the The Boston Maya User Group (bMug) which was founded in 2010 by Tereza Flaxman. United into one 3D powerhouse, BostonAAUGA and mBug serve as a forum for 3D artists and animators seeking professional training, community engagement and networking opportunities. BostonAAUGA hosts outstanding industry speakers and panelists. It should be noted that not all of their events are game industry specific hence their number 10 slot ranking. BostonAAUGA is regularly hosted at Neoscape in Boston, MA.

Membership Required: No Membership
Admission to Meetings: Free

Web: http://www.aaugaboston.com/

Twitter: @BostonAAUGA

Get out there!

—-

Elliott Mitchell
Technical Director @ Infrared5.com
Indie Game Developer
Twitter: @mrt3d

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GDC12 – Game Developer Conference 2012: a Post-Mortem

March 30th, 2012 by Elliott Mitchell

GDC12- AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!! (Force = Mass x Acceleration) by Dejoban Games and Owlchemy Labs, played by Oleg Pridiuk (Unity Technologies) as Ichiro Lambe (Dejobaan Games) and Deniz Opal (Cerebral Fix) watch - Photo Elliott Mitchell (Infrared5)

This year’s Game Developer Conference (GDC) 2012 was networking, networking and more networking.

Within a one mile proximity of the San Francisco Moscone Center, hordes of game developers and artists could be seen in the streets, cafes, bars, mall food courts, and hotel lobbies and heard talking shop, showing off their games, catching up with friends, debating the ethics of cloning social games from indies, shopping to find publishers, contractors and jobs. It was an intense meeting of the minds of people who make games in the streets of San Francisco.

Google Huddle chats, Google Groups email, shared Google Calendars and Twitter were all utilized very effectively to make the most of GDC. Multitudes of varied networking opportunities streamed in real-time through my iPhone 24/7. The level of my success at GDC was determined by how much networking I could possibly handle. With the help of my friends and the social/mobile networks,  success was at my fingertips.

In addition to the obsessive networking, there were many other valuable aspects of GDC. I’ll briefly highlight a few:

Jeff Ward’s Pre-GDC Board Game Night

GDC12- Elliott Mitchell (Infrared5), John Romero (Loot Drop), Brenda Garno Brathwaite (Loot Drop) & Elizabeth Sampat (Loot Drop) playing games at Jeff Ward's (Fire Hose Games) 3rd Annual Pre-GDC Board Game Night - Photo Drew Sikora

Jeff Ward (Fire Hose Games) knows how to get an amazing collection of game designers and developers together for a night playing board games. This was one of my favorite events of GDC. When else would I ever be able to play board games with John Romero (Loot Drop) and Brenda Garno Brathwaite (Loot Drop) while enjoying hors d’oeuvre and spirits? The crowd was a rich blend of artists, game developers, game designers, indies, students and superstars. There were so many new and classic games to play. I personally played Family Business and a really fun indie game prototype about operating a successful co-operative restaurant. Walking around after playing my games, I observed a host of other cool games being played and pitched. I’ll definitely be back for this event next year.

Independent Games Summit and Main Conference Sessions

GDC12 Ryan Creighton (Untold Entertainment) presenting Ponycorns: Catching Lightning in a Jar- Photo Elliott Mitchell (Infrared5)

Many session topics were super interesting but it wasn’t possible to attend all of them. Luckily, those with a GDC All-Access pass have access to the GDC Vault filled with recorded sessions. Here are a few sessions I saw which I found useful and interesting:

*Perhaps a Time of Miracles Was at Hand: The Business & Development of #Sworcery (Nathan Vella – Capy Games)

*The Pursuit of Indie Happiness: Making Great Games without Going Crazy (Aaron Isaksen – Indie Fund LLC)

*Ponycorns: Catching Lightning in a Jar (Ryan Creighton – Untold Entertainment)

*Light Probe Interpolation Using Tetrahedral Tessellations (Robert Cupisz – Unity Technologies)

Independent Game Festival Contestants on the Expo Floor

I played a bunch of the Independent Games Festival contestants’ games on the Expo floor

GDC12 - Alex Schwartz (Owlchemy Labs) playing Johann Sebastian Joust (Die Gute Fabrik) - Photo Elliott Mitchell (Infrared5)

before the festival winners are announced. There was a whole lot of innovation on display from this group. I particularly loved Johann Sebastian Joust (Die Gute Fabrik), a game without graphics, and Dear Esther (thechineseroom) which is stunning eye candy. Check out all the games here.

12th Annual Game Developer Choice Awards

I was super stoked to see two indies win big!

Superbrothers: Sword & Sorcery EP (Capy Games/Superbrothers) took the Best Handheld/Mobile Game award.

Johann Sebastian Joust (Die Gute Fabrik) won the Innovation Award.  Johann Sebastian Joust is worthy of it’s own blog post in the future.

EXPO FLOOR

* Unity booth – Cool tech from Unity and development venders partners showing off their wares
* Google Booth – Go Home Dinosaurs (Fire Hose Games) on Google Chrome
* Autodesk Booth (Maya and Mudbox)
* Indie Game Festival area ( All of it)

GDC12 - Chris Allen (Brass Monkey) and Andrew Kostuik (Brass Monkey) at the Unity Booth - Photo by Elliott Mitchell (Infrared5)

GDC PLAY

Lots of cool tech at the 1st Annual GDC Play. Our sister company, Brass Monkey, impressed onlookers with their Brass Monkey Controller for mobile devices and Play Brass Monkey web portal for both 2d and 3d games.

UNITY FTW!

Last but not least, the most useful and pleasurable highlight of GDC was face time with the Unity Technology engineers and management. Sure, I’m on email, Skype, Twitter and Facebook with these guys but nothing is like face to face time with this crew. Time and access to Unity’s founders, engineers, evangelists and management is worth the price of GDC admission. Can’t wait until Unite 2012 in Amsterdam and GDC13 next March!

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