He’s BAAAaaaack!

November 10th, 2015 by Paul Gregoire

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Why on earth would anyone choose to rejoin a company where they previously worked? In retrospect, the answer seems quite simple, though of course, taking the plunge is always a daunting task. I assume the statistics do not favor a return to a previous workplace after an extended hiatus, but I could certainly provide a plethora of reasons why I returned to Infrared5 when presented with the opportunity to do so. For me, and in any and all endeavors, the work has to be both intellectually stimulating and challenging. Software development can often be repetitive and monotonous, but fortunately that never was (and still isn’t) the case at Infrared5. Of near equal importance are the workmates that surround me; without a high quality, collaborative and generally pleasant team, even the most stimulating work can lose its shine.

So to that end, here is a short checklist I used when making the decision:

1. Do I enjoy my interactions with my teammates? Check!

2. Do I have respect for them and their abilities? Check!

3. Lastly, Infrared5 wanted to pay me to write code all day and work on Red5! Well that’s a no brainer–count me in!

While working for another company, I had joined the Red5 Pro beta just after it was announced on Twitter. A “Pro” version or Red5 was something Dominick and I had chatted about on a few occasions back in the day–there may or may not have been beer involved. Despite the casual conversations, we both thought there could be immense long-term value in providing the Red5 community with what they were always asking for and talking about on the users list and social media. Providing the ability to stream from any device to any device has always interested me. Alas, I had the desire to turn intrigue into application by helping to create a software which could do just this. Red5 Pro offers Flash streaming, HLS streaming, and RTSP streaming; these technologies are still in-demand and are not interoperable on existing platforms, except on Red5 Pro.

In the near future, the public can expect some major disruption on the streaming media front from Red5 Pro. It should come as no surprise to the community that we’re adding the new hotness of technology, WebRTC, to our existing stack. If this addition isn’t “For the Win,” I don’t know what is. I have no qualms about saying that the suite of tools which comprise Red5 Pro will help shape the future of the streaming market–and I couldn’t be happier with my decision to return.

-Paul

 

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The benefits to working in an Agile process

October 7th, 2013 by Jes Palmer


Here at Infrared5, our team of designers and developers have dedicated a lot of effort to fine-tuning a process that works most effectively and efficiently for both the client and our team. We want to share why we feel working in an Agile process has not only been successful on our projects in the past, but also want our future clients to have an understanding of how this works in their benefit on upcoming projects. Read the rest of this entry »

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My Thoughts on Glass

August 27th, 2013 by Chris Allen

I recently took a trip down to NYC a few weeks ago to pick up my new Google Glass. I figured now that we’ve had a bit of time to play with it here at Infrared5 and Brass Monkey, it’s time to write a post on our findings and what we think.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Multithreading Perceptual Computing Applications in Unity3d

August 21st, 2013 by Steff Kelsey

Once again we are excited about being featured on the Intel Developer Zone blog for a post done by Infrared5 Senior Developer Steff Kelsey. This post Multithreading Perceptual Computing Application in Unity3d talks about the challenges the Infrared5 team faced while participating in the Intel Ultimate Coder Challenge. Follow the link to hear the steps we went through to make Kiwi Catapult Revenge a reality! As always, we love hearing your feedback and feel free to share with others.

http://software.intel.com/en-us/blogs/2013/07/26/multithreading-perceptual-computing-applications-in-unity3d

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The Bus Rule

August 13th, 2013 by Adam Doucette

“What happens if you get hit by a bus?”

This question, though macabre, is something of an inside joke between office workers. Ask almost anyone who has worked in an office about “The Bus Rule”, and they will laugh knowingly. “The Bus Rule” can be explained as being short-phrase for ensuring someone else at your work understands your responsibilities and, in the unlikely case that you were to get hit by a bus, this person would be able to handle those responsibilities in your place. Although this morbid and dark analogy is not the most pleasant image to think about, ensuring your work can be continued in your absence (hopefully under less dramatic circumstances) is important to consider.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Kiwi Katapult Revenge Case Study by Intel

July 29th, 2013 by Adam Doucette

Earlier this year, Intel invited Infrared5 to compete in its Ultimate Coder Challenge: Going Perceptual, a groundbreaking contest that provided participants with an Ultrabook device, Creative Interactive Gesture Camera development kits, a still-evolving perceptual computing SDK, and all of the support possible for letting their imaginations run rampant. With its focus on sensor-based input, using Brass Monkey technology seemed a natural complement to perceptual computing, but the question surfaced of how to mesh the two. William Van Winkle recounts the story our team experienced in this challenging but fulfilling opportunity. As always, we welcome all questions and feedback. Enjoy!

http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/infrared5-case-study

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“From Paper to Pixels” – Interview with Artist Aaron North

June 25th, 2013 by Adam Doucette

As we near the date of ‘From Paper to Pixels’, we will be profiling some of the artists involved. This week we are featuring Aaron North.

Aaron North’s creatures exist in a realm completely of his own. Recognizable animals bend and shift into humans and back into animals. North places these figures in surrealist environments in which the figures appear to suggest symbiotic relationships. Often the creatures are interacting with objects such as chairs and dressers that suggest a relationship to domesticity, leading the viewer to question just what the nature of these creatures could be and to think twice about what could be dwelling in the shadows of our own homes.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Infrared5 Developer Steff Kelsey featured on Intel Developer Zone Blog

June 20th, 2013 by Adam Doucette

Recently our own Developer-extraordinaire Steff Kelsey (@thecodevik1ng) was featured on the Intel Developer Zone blog with his post – Masking RGB Inputs with Depth Data using the Intel PercC SDK and OpenCV. Steff and our team here at Infrared5 took part in Intel’s Ultimate Coder Challenge in the building of Kiwi Catapult Revenge using the Intel Perceptual Computing SDK. Check out Steff’s article below as he goes through the approaches used, what to look out for, and he provides some example code.

Steff Kelsey Intel Blog Post

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Design Occlusion is Killing Your Game Design

June 5th, 2013 by Adriel Calder

Last March, while at the annual Game Developer’s Conference in San Francisco, I attended numerous enlightening talks focusing on the different ways one can approach game design.  The one that stood out to me the most was titled “Design Occlusion is Killing Your Creativity” presented by Dylan Cuthbert of Q-Games.  Cuthbert’s talk focused mainly on his time working for Shigeru Miyamoto on Star Fox for the SNES and the lessons he learned as a young game developer working with an established person in the industry.  In addition to this, Cuthbert was also faced with understanding and appreciating the differences between British and Japanese approaches to design. “We were a very cocky sort of British programmers…sort of taught ourselves everything and we were suddenly thrown into this Japanese environment….and we were kind of in awe and also kind of in shock at the same time about the process.”

Read the rest of this entry »

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WebRTC

May 15th, 2013 by Dominick Accattato

What is WebRTC

In the world of disruptive technologies, WebRTC has quickly caught the attention of the web development community. WebRTC at its core provides real-time communication between browsers. The following represents the group’s mission statement:

WebRTC is a free, open project that enables web browsers with Real-Time Communications (RTC) capabilities via simple Javascript APIs. The WebRTC components have been optimized to best serve this purpose.

Our mission: To enable rich, high quality, RTC applications to be developed in the browser via simple Javascript APIs and HTML5.

Why was WebRTC created

WebRTC has humble beginnings but grand expectations based on source code that Google decided to open source. The original code came from two companies: Global IP Sound (for voice) and On2 (for video). These two companies were acquired by Google for the codecs and security based protocols for peer to peer streaming technology. On2 was the source for the webm project and codec.

Why is it interesting

WebRTC is interesting for so many reasons, but for real-time streaming developers it brings full circle what we have been working on for over 10 years. Previous to WebRTC, people were streaming with either their own proprietary technology or through a browser plugin. The most ubiquitous plugin was, and still is the Flash Player. Flash still remains today the best option for web conferences that want to maintain backwards compatibility with older browsers and leverage a full stack of streaming technologies.

However, WebRTC is steadily gaining momentum and will eventually overcome the advantages that Flash currently has in this space. It will take a bit of time for the technology to increase adoption, but it will eventually happen and many of the leading browser vendors are behind the movement. Especially since the standards are supported by the W3C and IETF working groups.

What are the current challenges?

Currently WebRTC has some challenges. First, it still needs wider acceptance and adoption. At this moment, only Chrome (Stable) and Firefox (Nightly) have support. Internet Explorer has expressed interest, but Safari has not made any indication that they would provide support. That said, if all the other major vendors end up supporting the standard, Safari would most likely follow suit.

Also, since the technology is largely peer to peer, there isn’t a great solution for a media server yet. In addition, the technology requires implementors install either a STUN or TURN server. A STUN server basically facilitates “hole punching” which is what is needed for NAT traversal through firewalls. A TURN server is basically a STUN server with extensions that allow it to also act as a fallback media relay server. Regardless, it’s still difficult to choose the right STUN/TURN server to work with, but I’m sure this will become more clear as the standards and implementors start to roll out more products.

In addition, there is still much work to be done on the specifications. The standards boards are continuing their efforts on the creation of their working drafts. These will eventually be published standards and RFC’s.

What are the main API Interfaces?

You can visit the following site for a good description of the API’s (http://docs.webplatform.org/wiki/apis/webrtc)

What about Flash Streaming?

I’ve thought about how this will affect the current ecosystem of Flash Streaming which basically dominates the video streaming on the Internet today. As Flash has a large adoption rate, it will continue to thrive and will even remain as a great backward compatible solution. At this point, I still feel like the Actionscript API’s are easier to work with and the aggregated technology behind Flash Streaming appears to be easier to work with, but that is a biased statement since I’ve been working with Flash Streaming for over 10 years.

Many groups are also still very interested in how WebRTC will affect Red5. I can only say that at this time, the Red5 developers including myself, are excited about the potential of WebRTC, and we plan to modernize Red5 to accommodate this new plugin-less approach.

Conclusion

So I hope I’ve drawn some attention to this very new and exciting technology. We at Infrared5 hope to put this technology to use for our clients. If you’re interested in a project based on WebRTC, just drop us a message.

More Information

Project Website: http://www.webrtc.org/

Google Code Project: https://code.google.com/p/webrtc/

WebRTC Blog: http://www.webrtc.org/blog

W3C Editor’s Draft: http://dev.w3.org/2011/webrtc/editor/webrtc.html

WebRTC Example: https://apprtc.appspot.com/?r=65920333

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