Infrared5 Participating in the Intel Ultimate Coder Challenge

April 18th, 2013 by admin

Perceptual Computing Challenge Winner to be Announced Next Week

Boston, MA – April 18, 2013 – Infrared5, an innovative Boston-based interactive studio, today
announced that the company is one of only seven developer teams participating in the Intel® Ultimate
Coder Challenge, and the only East Coast team.

The seven teams used the latest Intel Ultrabook™ devices, the Intel Perceptual Computing Software
Developers Kit (SDK), and Creative® Interactive Gesture Camera to build a special application prototype
in just seven weeks. The Ultimate Coder teams, including the Infrared5 team, blogged about their
experiences online and a panel of experts will crown the Ultimate Coder on April 24.

The Intel Ultimate Coder Challenge is designed to promote the use of perceptual computing. Perceptual
computing creates more immersive software applications by incorporating 2D/3D object tracking, user
gesture control, facial analysis and recognition, eye control, and voice recognition. Perceptual computing
is more than just the use of touch screens; it is a new area of pioneering development.

“The Intel Ultimate Coder Challenge provides a great opportunity for participants to innovate around
perceptual computing, and learn from peers in a few short weeks,” said Bob Duffy, community manager
for the Intel Developer Zone at Intel.

“We’re very comfortable with pioneering applications of technology,” said Rebecca Smith Allen, Infrared5
CEO and part of the Challenge team. “Perceptual computing is a new frontier we’re excited to explore.”

“The combination of the immersive properties of Brass Monkey and the power of perceptual computing
allowed our team to give the judges a unique experience that will hopefully earn us the Ultimate Coder
title,” said Chris Allen, the project leader. Allen is CEO of BrassMonkey, a next generation browser-based
game system created by the Infrared5 team.

In this game, the player uses a phone to fly a character around a 3D world. When game players turn
their head, the perceptual computing camera tracks what the player is looking at, causing the scene to
shift. This effect allows the player to peer around obstacles, giving the game a real sense of depth and
immersion.

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