IR-top-5 Design and Development Tools

September 13th, 2013 by Adam Doucette

Here at Infrared5, we like to share our knowledge and insights on what is the latest and greatest in the world around us. We are starting a new monthly feature on the Infrared5 blog, our IR-top-5 (yeah I know…so clever). We will poll our team on certain topics and give them free rain to share their individual 2 cents on the topic. It could range from top-5 MMO games to top-5 IPA’s. To kick things off, I asked our team of Developers and Designers to share their picks for tools they are currently using which help work better. Besides pretty much getting an auto-reply from everyone with the word “BEER” in it (yes, in caps), here are what the Infrared5 team had to share about the top-5 design and development tools.

Read the rest of this entry »

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Top 10 Prominent Boston Area Game Developer Groups and Organizations That You Should Pay Attention To

December 14th, 2012 by Elliott Mitchell

Top 10 Prominent Boston Area Game Developer Groups and Organizations That You Should Pay Attention To:

Scott Macmillan (co-founder Boston Indies), Darius Kazemi (co-organizer Boston Post Mortem) and Alex Schwartz (co-founder Boston Unity Group) preparing for a Boston Post Mortem presentation July 2011. (Photo- Elliott Mitchell co-founder Boston Unity Group)

The Boston area game developer scene has a generous and open community that nurtures indies, startups, students and AAA game studios alike. The evidence of this is more than abundant. On almost any given day one can find a game industry event ranging from casual meet-ups, demo nights and intense panel discussions. As I am an indie game developer and technical director, I will focus more closely on groups that are indie game developer related. One thing can be assured, all of these groups are prominent, worthwhile and you should check them out if you haven’t already done so!

1 ) International Game Developers Association (IDGA) – Boston Post Mortem (BPM)

The Boston based chapter of the IDGA was founded in 1997 by Kent Quirk, Steve Meretzk & Rick Goodman at John Harvard’s Brewhouse. Boston Post Mortem is internationally renowned as an example of how to grow and nurture a game developer community. BPM is the seminal game developer organization in the Boston area. Currently held at The Skellig in Waltham, MA, BPM is a monthly IDGA chapter meeting focused around industry related topics. BPM hosts expert speakers, industry panels, great networking opportunities and grog.

Frequency: Monthly
Membership Required: No, but IDGA membership is encouraged
Admission to Meetings: Usually free
Web: http://www.bostonpostmortem.org/
Twitter: @BosPostMortem

2 ) Boston Indies (BI)

Boston Indies is, as the name would indicate, a Boston based group for indie game developers. BI was founded in 2009 by Scott Macmillan and Jim Buck as an indie game developer alternative to the large Boston Post Mortem group.  Boston Indies featured indie developer presentations, BYOB and chipping in for pizza. Meet-ups were hosted at the Betahouse co-working space at MIT in Cambridge, MA. BI quickly grew larger and moved locations to The Asgard and settling most recently at the Bocoup Loft in South Boston. At BI meetups, indie developers present on relevant topics, hold game demo nights and network. Boston Indies is notable because it spawned the very successful Boston Festival of Indie Games in the fall of 2012.

Frequency: Monthly
Membership Required: No
Admission to Meetings: Free
Web: www.bostonindies.com
Twitter: @BostonIndies

3 ) The Boston Unity Group (BUG)

Founded in 2012 by Alex Schwartz and Elliott Mitchell, The Boston Unity User Group (BUG) is a bi-monthly gathering of Unity developers in the Boston area. Born from the inspiration and traditions of Boston Post Mortem and Boston Indies, BUG events are Unity game development related meetups where members ranging from professionals to hobbyist unite to learn from presentations, demo their projects, network and continue to build bridges in the Boston area game development community and beyond. BUG is renowned by local and international developers, as well as by Unity Technologies, as one of the first and largest Unity user groups in the world. Meetings have been frequently held at the Microsoft New England Research Center, Meadhall and the Asgard in Cambridge, MA.

Frequency:  Bi-Monthly
Membership Required:  Meetup.com registration required
Admission to Meetings:  Free
Web:  http://www.meetup.com/B-U-G-Boston-Unity-Group/
Twitter:  @BosUnityGroup

4 ) Women In Games (WIG)

Founded by Courtney Stanton in 2010, Women in Games Boston is the official Boston chapter of the International Game Developers Association’s Women in Games Special Interest Group. Renown industry speakers present on relevant game development topics but what differentiates WIG is the it’s predominately female perspective and unique industry support. WIG meets monthly at The Asgard in Cambridge. Developers from AAA, indie studios and students regularly attend. WIG is an event open to women and their allies to attend.

Frequency: Monthly
Membership Required: No
Admission to Meetings: Free
Web: http://wigboston.wordpress.com/
Twitter: @WIGboston

5 ) Boston HTML5 Game Development Group

The Boston HTML5 Game Developer Group was founded in 2010 by Pascal Rettig. On the group’s meetup webpage, the description reads  “A gathering of the minds on tips, tricks and best practices for using HTML5 as a platform for developing highly-interactive in-browser applications (with a focus on Game Development)”. The HTML5 game development Group in Boston boasts an impressive roster of members and speakers. Attended and led by prominent industry leaders and innovators, the Boston HTML5 Game Developer Group is a monthly meetup held at Bocoup Loft in Boston, MA.

Membership Required: Meetup membership encouraged
Admission to Meetings: Free
Web: http://www.meetup.com/Boston-HTML5-Game-Development/
Twitter: #Boston #HTML5

6 ) MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge  - New England Games Community Circle (NEGamesSIG)

Originally founded in 2007 by Michael Cavaretta as The New England Game SIG, newly renamed New England Games Community Cirle  is a group rooted in greater MIT Enterprise Forum of Cambridge. NEGCC focuses on being a hub for dynamic games and interactive entertainment industries throughout New England.  NEGCC events are predictably very good and well attended with their professional panel discussions featuring a mix of innovative leaders from across the business of games. Events regularly are held in various locations around Cambridge, MA including the MIT Stata Center and the Microsoft New England Research Center.

Frequency: Regularly dispersed throughout the year
Membership Required: Not Always / Membership encouraged with worthwhile benefits.
Admission to Meetings: Depends on event and if you’re a member
Web: http://gamescircle.org/
Twitter: #NEGCC #NEGamesSIG

7 ) The Massachusetts Digital Games Institute (MassDiGI)

The Massachusetts Digital Games Institute was founded in 2010 by Timothy Loew and Robert E. Johnson, Ph. D.  This is a unique group focused on building pathways between academia and industry, while nurturing entrepreneurship and economic development within the game industry across Massachusetts. MassDiGI holds game industry related events not only in the Boston area but across the entire Commonwealth. MassDiGI also runs some larger events and programs like the MassDiGI Game Challenge, where prominent industry experts mentor competing game development teams. Mass DiGI also holds a Summer of Innovation Program where students are mentored by industry experts while they form teams and develop marketable games over the summer. Mass DiGI is headquartered at Becker College in Worcester, MA.

Frequency: Slightly Random
Membership Required: No Membership
Admission to Meetings: Mostly free / Some events and programs cost money
Web: http://www.massdigi.org/
Twitter: @mass_digi

8 ) Mass Technology Leadership Council – Digital Games Cluster (MassTLC)

MassTLC is a large organization that encompasses much more than games. The MassTLC Digital Games Cluster is led by the likes of Tom Hopcroft and Christine Nolan, among others, who work diligently to raise awareness about the region’s game industry and build support for a breadth of Massachusetts game developers.  MassTLC holds regular events benefit startups, midsized companies and large corporations across Massachusetts. With a focus on economic development, MassTLC helps those those looking to network, find mentors, funding and other resources vital to a game studio of any scale. One of my favorite MassTLC events is the MassTLC PAX East – Made in MA Party. The Party serves to highlight hundreds of Massachusetts game developers to the media as well as out of state industry folks on the evening before the the massive PAX East game developer conference begins. MassTLC Events are frequently held at the Microsoft New England Research Center.

Frequency: Regularly / Slightly Random
Membership Required: Not Always / Membership encouraged with worthwhile benefits.
Admission to Meetings: Depends on event and if you’re a member
Web: http://www.masstlc.org/?page=DigitalGames
Twitter: @MassTLC

9 ) Boston Game Jams

Founded in 2011 by Darren Torpey, Boston Game Jams is a unique group. Modeled after the Nordic Game Jam, IGDA Global Game Jam and others less  known game jams, Boston Game Jams is an ongoing series of ad-hoc game jams held in the Boston area. As Darren States on the Boston Game Jam’s website, “It is not a formal organization of any kind, but rather it’s more of a grassroots community that is growing out of a shared desire to learn and create games together in an open, fun, and highly collaborative environment.” Boston Game Jams is a great venue for people of all skill levels to come together and collaboratively create games around given themes within a very short period of time. Participants range from professionals to novices. Boston Game Jams have historically been held at the innovative Singapore-MIT GAMBIT Game Lab which has recently morphed into the new MIT Game Lab.

Frequency: Random
Membership Required: No
Admission to Meetings: Free / Food Donations Welcome
Web: http://bostongamejams.com/
Twitter: @bostongamejams

10 ) Boston Autodesk Animation User Group Association (BostonAAUGA)

BostonAAUGA is an official Autodesk User Group. Founded in 2008, BostonAAUGA joined forces in June 2012 with the The Boston Maya User Group (bMug) which was founded in 2010 by Tereza Flaxman. United into one 3D powerhouse, BostonAAUGA and mBug serve as a forum for 3D artists and animators seeking professional training, community engagement and networking opportunities. BostonAAUGA hosts outstanding industry speakers and panelists. It should be noted that not all of their events are game industry specific hence their number 10 slot ranking. BostonAAUGA is regularly hosted at Neoscape in Boston, MA.

Membership Required: No Membership
Admission to Meetings: Free

Web: http://www.aaugaboston.com/

Twitter: @BostonAAUGA

Get out there!

—-

Elliott Mitchell
Technical Director @ Infrared5.com
Indie Game Developer
Twitter: @mrt3d

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GameDraw: 3D Power in Unity

October 5th, 2012 by Elliott Mitchell


At Infrared5, we are continuously seeking ways to improve the quality of our craft while increasing our efficiency in developing games for our clients. Our Unity engineers and creatives are ninjas, masters of their trade, and yet there are situations when leveraging the Unity’s Asset Store is extremely advantageous. Why reinvent the wheel by creating extra custom tools when there are relatively inexpensive, pre-existing tools in the Asset Store? GameDraw, by Mixed Dimensions, is one of those indispensable tools available on the Unity Asset Store.

I had the pleasure of evaluating a few pre-release builds of GameDraw after meeting the Mixed Dimensions team at GDC 2012 and more recently at Unite 2012. I was super impressed on both occasions. As stated by Mixed Dimensions, ‘The purpose of GameDraw is to make the life of designers easier by giving them possibilities inside Unity itself and cutting down time and cost.’’ GameDraw is not exactly a single tool, perhaps better described as an expansive suite of 3D tools for the Unity Editor.  Within GameDraw, one can actually manipulate pre-existing models, create new 3D assets, optimize 3D assets and a whole lot more.


Key Features Are:

Polygonal Modeling, Sculpting, Generation and Optimization Tools
UV Editor
City Generator
Runtime API
Character Customizer

Each of these features individually are worth the cost of GameDraw on the Asset Store. Drilling down deeper, GameDraw offers much more. It’s pretty amazing to see the degree of power GameDraw unleashes in the Unity Editor, offering features such as:

Mesh Editing ( Vertex, Edge, Triangle, Element)
Mesh manipulation functions (Extrude, Weld, Subdivide, Delete, Smooth,…etc)
Assigning new Materials
Mesh Optimization
UV editing
Primitives (25 basic model)
Sculpting
Boolean operations
Node based mesh generation
2D tools (Geometry painting, 2D to 3D image tracing)
Character customizer (NEXT UPDATE V 0,87)
City Generator (NEXT UPDATE V 0.87)
Warehouse “hundreds of free assets” (NEXT UPDATE V 0.87)

As a Beta product, GameDraw is slightly more functional on the PC than the Mac computers at the moment. Even though I primarily use a Mac in my daily routine, I was very impressed with GameDraw’s functionality on the Mac.


Being a hardcore Maya artist, I can’t see GameDraw eliminating my need for Maya anytime soon. I use Maya for more than creating Unity assets. However, I happily purchased the GameDraw from the Asset Store and use it on projects. I see a significant number of  instances when I want the ability to make changes to models, create new models, generate a cities, animate morph targets…all within Unity. For any of these tasks alone, GameDraw is a must have and very worth the cost.

-Elliott Mitchell

TD Infrared5
Co-Founder Boston Unity Group

Follow us on Twitter! @infrared5

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Unite 2012 – The Unity Developer Conference

September 7th, 2012 by Elliott Mitchell

Unite 2012

Last week, Unity Technologies held their 6th annual Unite developer’s conference in Amsterdam, Holland. Approximately 4.5 thousand miles from last year’s venue in San Francisco, Unite was attended by developers from 26 nations along with Unity’s 200+ amazing employees!

The conference featured several excellent keynote talks, a look at some exciting things to come for Unity, and an opportunity to engage in an exciting community. The following is an overview of my time at Unite 2012.

Unite 2012 Jack Lumber talk

The conference was spread over 4 days and 3 venues:

Day 1 – Training Day and Unity Mixer
Day 2 – Keynote & Main Conference
Day 3 – Main Conference, Unity Awards & Unity Party
Day 4 – Main Conference & Sad Goodbyes

Amsterdam was a great choice for Unite 2012. The international nature of the city, it’s rich cultural identity, excellent public transportation and welcoming nature of the people all synergize to elevate the conference to a new level.

The bulk of the conference was filled with interesting sessions on topics such as: art pipelines, rendering pipelines, virtual worlds, running an indie studio, advanced editor scripting, super cool simulators, creating universes, making tools for Unity, using Flash and Unity together, animation systems and so on. You can view video recordings of many of the talks on Unity’s website. Hopefully, all the talks will be added in the near future.

Between sessions, meetings, and meals, time was allocated for developers and artists to network, catch up, drink, play J.S. Joust and talk shop. This time was truly priceless.

J. S. Jousting at Unite 2012 (Photo and J. S. Joust courtesy of Julie Heyde)

I was honored to participate on a panel geared towards organizing and supporting user group communities with folks from Unity (Joe Robbins, Will Goldstone, Mark Martin, Russ Morris, Carl Carth ) and a few other fellow user group organizers (Grant Viklund, Brandon Wu and Robert Brackenridge). We had good turnout, great pointers, super questions from the audience and momentum moving forward in a more organized manner.

Unite featured keynotes by Unity founders David Helgason, Joachim Ante, Nicholas Francis and infamous Game Designer Peter Molyneux.  All the speakers delivered fascinating keynotes. You can watch the official video of the Unite 2012 Keynote here.


My Short List of Unity 4 Keynote Announcements:

  • Mecanim – next generation character animation system
  • Shuriken Particle Engine – Collision with Particles
  • Mobile Shadows
  • Bumpmap Terrain
  • New Project Browser
  • Improved Lightmaps
  • DirectX 11 Rendering
  • Ship Unity 4 Beta to Prepaid Customers
  • Adobe Partnership for Flash Export
  • New Unity GUI!!
  • Linux Support
  • Future Windows 8 Export
  • Future Windows Phone 8 Export

I thought the most impressive keynote highlight was the 3 minute short “Butterfly Effect” created by Passion Pictures and Unity technologies.  Not only is it visually stunning, the film is real-time rendered in DirectX 11. Butterfly Effect is completely filmic with SSS Shaders, stunning procedural explosions, high quality animation and rendering. Butterfly Effect is a work of art to behold!

David Helgason (Unity) & Elliott Mitchell (Infrared5) Unite 2012 Party

As always, the Unity Awards and Unity Party celebrated so many great Unity games and projects in the wild at the Muziekgebouw. See the award winners here.

I’m looking forward to Unite 2013 rumored to be held in San Francisco. If your a Unity developer or interested in making games with Unity, then Unite it’s a must attend event! Hopefully, I’ll be speaking at Unite again next year. See you there!

——–>

-Elliott Mitchell

Technical Director Infrared5

Co-founder of the Boston Unity Group

@MrT.3D on Twitter

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Boid Flocking and Pathfinding in Unity, Part 3

July 23rd, 2012 by Anthony Capobianchi

In this final installment, I will explore how to set up a ray caster to determine a destination object for the Boids, and how to organize a number of different destination points for your Boids so that they do not pile on top of each other.

Organizing the Destinations -

The idea is to create a marker for every Boid that will be placed near the destination, defined by the ray caster. This keeps Boids from running past each other or pushing each other off track.

For each Boid in the scene, a new Destination object will be created and managed. My Destination.cs script looks like this:

This is very similar to the Boid behaviors we set up in Boid.cs. We create coherency and separation vectors just as before, except this time we use a rigid body that has the two vectors being applied to it. I am using rigid body’s velocity property to determine when the destination objects are finished moving into position.

Positioning and Managing the Destinations -

Now we create a script that handles instantiating all the destination objects we need for our Boids, placing each one in relation to a Boid, and using each destination’s Boid behaviors to organize them  I created a script called DestinationManager.cs where this will be housed.

First off we need to set up our script:


We need to create our ray caster that will tell the scene where to place the origin of our placement nodes. Mine looks like this:


The ray caster shoots a ray from the camera’s position to the ground, setting the Boid’s destination where it hits.

Next, we take the destinations that were created and move them together using the Boid behaviors we gave them.


The Boid system is primarily used for the positioning of the Destination objects. This method ensures that the Boid system will not push your objects off of their paths, confusing any pathfinding you may be using.

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GDC12 – Game Developer Conference 2012: a Post-Mortem

March 30th, 2012 by Elliott Mitchell

GDC12- AaaaaAAaaaAAAaaAAAAaAAAAA!!! (Force = Mass x Acceleration) by Dejoban Games and Owlchemy Labs, played by Oleg Pridiuk (Unity Technologies) as Ichiro Lambe (Dejobaan Games) and Deniz Opal (Cerebral Fix) watch - Photo Elliott Mitchell (Infrared5)

This year’s Game Developer Conference (GDC) 2012 was networking, networking and more networking.

Within a one mile proximity of the San Francisco Moscone Center, hordes of game developers and artists could be seen in the streets, cafes, bars, mall food courts, and hotel lobbies and heard talking shop, showing off their games, catching up with friends, debating the ethics of cloning social games from indies, shopping to find publishers, contractors and jobs. It was an intense meeting of the minds of people who make games in the streets of San Francisco.

Google Huddle chats, Google Groups email, shared Google Calendars and Twitter were all utilized very effectively to make the most of GDC. Multitudes of varied networking opportunities streamed in real-time through my iPhone 24/7. The level of my success at GDC was determined by how much networking I could possibly handle. With the help of my friends and the social/mobile networks,  success was at my fingertips.

In addition to the obsessive networking, there were many other valuable aspects of GDC. I’ll briefly highlight a few:

Jeff Ward’s Pre-GDC Board Game Night

GDC12- Elliott Mitchell (Infrared5), John Romero (Loot Drop), Brenda Garno Brathwaite (Loot Drop) & Elizabeth Sampat (Loot Drop) playing games at Jeff Ward's (Fire Hose Games) 3rd Annual Pre-GDC Board Game Night - Photo Drew Sikora

Jeff Ward (Fire Hose Games) knows how to get an amazing collection of game designers and developers together for a night playing board games. This was one of my favorite events of GDC. When else would I ever be able to play board games with John Romero (Loot Drop) and Brenda Garno Brathwaite (Loot Drop) while enjoying hors d’oeuvre and spirits? The crowd was a rich blend of artists, game developers, game designers, indies, students and superstars. There were so many new and classic games to play. I personally played Family Business and a really fun indie game prototype about operating a successful co-operative restaurant. Walking around after playing my games, I observed a host of other cool games being played and pitched. I’ll definitely be back for this event next year.

Independent Games Summit and Main Conference Sessions

GDC12 Ryan Creighton (Untold Entertainment) presenting Ponycorns: Catching Lightning in a Jar- Photo Elliott Mitchell (Infrared5)

Many session topics were super interesting but it wasn’t possible to attend all of them. Luckily, those with a GDC All-Access pass have access to the GDC Vault filled with recorded sessions. Here are a few sessions I saw which I found useful and interesting:

*Perhaps a Time of Miracles Was at Hand: The Business & Development of #Sworcery (Nathan Vella – Capy Games)

*The Pursuit of Indie Happiness: Making Great Games without Going Crazy (Aaron Isaksen – Indie Fund LLC)

*Ponycorns: Catching Lightning in a Jar (Ryan Creighton – Untold Entertainment)

*Light Probe Interpolation Using Tetrahedral Tessellations (Robert Cupisz – Unity Technologies)

Independent Game Festival Contestants on the Expo Floor

I played a bunch of the Independent Games Festival contestants’ games on the Expo floor

GDC12 - Alex Schwartz (Owlchemy Labs) playing Johann Sebastian Joust (Die Gute Fabrik) - Photo Elliott Mitchell (Infrared5)

before the festival winners are announced. There was a whole lot of innovation on display from this group. I particularly loved Johann Sebastian Joust (Die Gute Fabrik), a game without graphics, and Dear Esther (thechineseroom) which is stunning eye candy. Check out all the games here.

12th Annual Game Developer Choice Awards

I was super stoked to see two indies win big!

Superbrothers: Sword & Sorcery EP (Capy Games/Superbrothers) took the Best Handheld/Mobile Game award.

Johann Sebastian Joust (Die Gute Fabrik) won the Innovation Award.  Johann Sebastian Joust is worthy of it’s own blog post in the future.

EXPO FLOOR

* Unity booth – Cool tech from Unity and development venders partners showing off their wares
* Google Booth – Go Home Dinosaurs (Fire Hose Games) on Google Chrome
* Autodesk Booth (Maya and Mudbox)
* Indie Game Festival area ( All of it)

GDC12 - Chris Allen (Brass Monkey) and Andrew Kostuik (Brass Monkey) at the Unity Booth - Photo by Elliott Mitchell (Infrared5)

GDC PLAY

Lots of cool tech at the 1st Annual GDC Play. Our sister company, Brass Monkey, impressed onlookers with their Brass Monkey Controller for mobile devices and Play Brass Monkey web portal for both 2d and 3d games.

UNITY FTW!

Last but not least, the most useful and pleasurable highlight of GDC was face time with the Unity Technology engineers and management. Sure, I’m on email, Skype, Twitter and Facebook with these guys but nothing is like face to face time with this crew. Time and access to Unity’s founders, engineers, evangelists and management is worth the price of GDC admission. Can’t wait until Unite 2012 in Amsterdam and GDC13 next March!

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Top 10 GDC Lists

March 1st, 2012 by Elliott Mitchell

GDC is approaching next week and I’ll be traveling to San Fransisco to participate in the epic game developer event. I’m psyched and here’s why:

TOP 10 GDC RELATED THINGS I’M EXCITED ABOUT

10  The Expo Floor
9    The History Of 3D Games exhibit
8    Experimental Gameplay Sessions
7    The Unity Party
6    Indie Game: The Movie screening & Panel
5    GDC Play
4    14th Annual Independent Games Festival Awards
3    Networking, Networking & Networking
2    Independent Game Summit
1    Unity Technology Engineers

TOP 10 GDC SESSIONS I’M LOOKING FORWARD TO

10  The Pursuit of Indie Happiness: Making Great Games without Going Crazy
9    Rapid, Iterative Prototyping Best Practices
8    Experimental Gameplay Sessions
7    Create New Genres (and Stop Wasting Your Life in the Clone Factories) [SOGS Design]
6    BURN THIS MOTHERFATHER! Game Dev Parents Rant
5    Bringing Large Scale Console Games to iOS Devices: A Technical Overview of The Bard’s Tale Adaptation
4    Light Probe Interpolation Using Tetrahedral Tessellations
3    Big Games in Small Packages: Lessons Learned In Bringing a Long-running PC MMO to Mobile
2    Art History for Game Devs: In Praise of Abstraction
1    Android Gaming on Tegra: The Future of Gaming is Now, and it’s on the Move! (Presented by NVIDIA)

If you’re going to be at GDC and want to talk shop with Infrared5 then please ping us! info (at) Infrared5 (dot) com

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The Evolution of Infrared5

June 21st, 2011 by Keith Peters

I joined Infrared5 back in November 2007. Those were very different times. We were a hard core Flash shop, focusing on Red5 Server based applications and Papervision3D. The iPhone had been out for less than six months and only Apple could write apps for it. The iPod Touch was just a few weeks old. Nobody had heard of Android. Tablets were just a failed venture by Microsoft that most people had forgotten about a few years before. Nobody was particularly excited about HTML (5 or otherwise) or JavaScript. If there was any perceived threat to Flash at the time, it might have been Silverlight, but nobody was particularly worried about that.

Now, the landscape is very different. I’m not going to say Flash is dead. I don’t think it is. I don’t even think that it is dying, per se. What is happening though, is that there are so many other cool and interesting things out there now, that Flash has lost its place in the spotlight for many developers. Also, I think that Flash initially had a very low learning curve and very little barrier to entry. A lot of Flash developers grew up as Flash did, learned real programming, object orientation, design patterns, best practices, etc., and were then able to branch out to other languages and platforms.

I have to say, that Infrared5 has not only rolled with the changes very well, but has completely embraced the change. I think virtually all of our front end developers are now seasoned iOS developers. Several have embraced Android development as well. We have Windows Phone 7 knowledge (mostly me), and our 3D platform has moved from Papervision to Unity. We’re doing HTML5 stuff as well as Flash and Flex sites, iPad apps, kiosk applications. Many of our projects even span multiple platforms – a Flex 4 app with an HTML5 public facing site, Flash or Unity 3D games with a companion iPhone app via Brass Monkey.

The company’s tag line is “Yeah, we can build that.” I’d say we’ve lived up to that.

In closing, I ran across this quote the other day that I really loved. It comes from a free on line book, “Learn Python the Hard Way”, by Zed A. Shaw, which you can find here: http://learnpythonthehardway.org/ . In the last section called “Advice From An Old Programmer”, he says:

“What I discovered after this journey of learning is that the languages did not matter, it’s what you do with them. Actually, I always knew that, but I’d get distracted by the languages and forget it periodically. Now I never forget it, and neither should you.

Which programming language you learn and use does not matter. Do not get sucked into the religion surrounding programming languages as that will only blind you to their true purpose of being your tool for doing interesting things.

Programming as an intellectual activity is the only art form that allows you to create interactive art. You can create projects that other people can play with, and you can talk to them indirectly. No other art form is quite this interactive. Movies flow to the audience in one direction. Paintings do not move. Code goes both ways.”

The full quote is here: http://learnpythonthehardway.org/book/advice.html

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Smartphones Consolidate to Three Platforms

January 31st, 2011 by Chris Allen

Smartphone PlatformsJust last week Sony announced that they would be supporting Android applications on their new NGP (Next Generation Portable), the highly anticipated successor to the PSP. They also announced that they would be allowing content created for the NGP would be available on other Android devices, making the PSP games that developers have built available on a wide range of non-Sony devices. Sony is calling this feature the PlayStation Suite. Essentially it’s a store run by Sony for Android, where users can purchase PlayStation games for their tablets and smartphones. This is a bold new move for a company that in the past has stuck to their own monolithic platform over which they kept complete and total control.

Nokia also looks like they may be going with a similar plan. Rumors are everywhere declaring that Nokia will either be choosing Android or Windows Phone 7 to run on their devices. Nokia CEO, Stephen Elop was quoted saying “In addition to great device experiences we must build, capitalise and/or join a competitive ecosystem”, implying that they are looking to make a move. While it’s clear that Nokia hasn’t settled on Android yet, the very fact that they are looking for a switch indicates the industry is moving towards consolidating into three smartphone operating systems.

In other news, there seem to be reliable sources stating that RIM may be doing something similar with future Blackberry devices. If BlackBerry and Nokia run Android apps, and Sony devices do as well, this is very good news for mobile game developers. Why is that? Quite simply because there will be less platforms to port to.

Already a huge number of game developers are moving to Unity 3D, a game development platform that allows for easy deployment to iOS, Android, their own Web player, Nintendo Wii and xBox 360. Using Unity the developer needs to write one code base that will work across multiple platforms with relatively minor tweaks. The fact that Unity already supports two of the main smartphone platforms (iOS and Android) is a huge win for mobile game developers!

With Sony support for Android apps on PSP, and RIM and Nokia possibly doing the same, this just means more devices we as game developers can target. Of course with our sister company’s platform, Brass Monkey, we also are going to have more consumers that will be able to turn their devices into controllers, and that’s definitely a good thing for us. Will the consolidation of operating systems in the market help your business? Are you a mobile game developer and think this is good news too? I would love to hear your feedback in the comments.

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Trailer: Star Wars Trench Run 2.0

August 4th, 2010 by Mike Oldham

Star Wars: Trench Run 2.0 Trailer from THQ Wireless on Vimeo.

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